B.S. Architecture & Design - University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

+ ARCH 272 Earl Prize Nominee (Spring 2017)

 Perspective Section
 Section & Elevation

Junior Studio Landscape Project 02 - Japan House Pavilion [Urbana, IL]

Located in Urbana, Illinois in a local arboretum, this pavilion considers its environmental and periodic context. The arboretum is home to the University of Illinois’ Japan house, garden, and more. The inspiration behind the building’s form derives from culture and functionality. Before the 1950’s, it was expected for extended families to share a single home divided into multiple units. These homes were composed of dierent wings accumulating into a U-like shape that had a shared common space in the middle for connecting. In the 21st century, this generational culture is returning. The ethnic culture of this arboretum and the time this building was designed lead to mimicking this design, but interpreted for its respective site. The Japanese styled pavilion with an elevated foundation that is planar throughout separates the property of the structure from its environment, symbolizing change in space. The spaces are divided into three main areas- the gallery, the oce, and the outdoor patio. Large glass curtain walls visually link the dierent spaces, creating a wholesome view from almost any point in the property. The large concrete walls on the East, North, And West side enclose the entire structure to keep it privatized from exterior pedestrians and unwanted sun lighting. The East and West walls also oer visual aid to direct attention to the layers of water dened by the reective pool and pond. Trees were added to the Northern side of the building to buer cold winds in Illinois. The combination of glass and concrete material are intended to create dierent elements of lightness and heaviness that come together as a consistent composition in structure. Wide roof slabs create extra shading for parts of the patio area, which could be utilized for a wide range of events and purposes. This enriched experience complies with ADA standards and adds deep culture of time and ethnicity to this valued part of Urbana, Illinois.

 Exploded Axonometric
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Junior Studio Landscape Project 01 - Artist’s residence

Located in Urbana, Illinois in a local arboretum, this pavilion considers its environmental and periodic context. The arboretum is home to the University of Illinois’ Japan house, garden, and more. The inspiration behind the building’s form derives from culture and functionality. Before the 1950’s, it was expected for extended families to share a single home divided into multiple units. These homes were composed of dierent wings accumulating into a U-like shape that had a shared common space in the middle for connecting. In the 21st century, this generational culture is returning. The ethnic culture of this arboretum and the time this building was designed lead to mimicking this design, but interpreted for its respective site. The Japanese styled pavilion with an elevated foundation that is planar throughout separates the property of the structure from its environment, symbolizing change in space. The spaces are divided into three main areas- the gallery, the oce, and the outdoor patio. Large glass curtain walls visually link the dierent spaces, creating a wholesome view from almost any point in the property. The large concrete walls on the East, North, And West side enclose the entire structure to keep it privatized from exterior pedestrians and unwanted sun lighting. The East and West walls also oer visual aid to direct attention to the layers of water dened by the reective pool and pond. Trees were added to the Northern side of the building to buer cold winds in Illinois. The combination of glass and concrete material are intended to create dierent elements of lightness and heaviness that come together as a consistent composition in structure. Wide roof slabs create extra shading for parts of the patio area, which could be utilized for a wide range of events and purposes. This enriched experience complies with ADA standards and adds deep culture of time and ethnicity to this valued part of Urbana, Illinois.

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floor-plan-2.jpg
 Site Plan

 

Junior Studio Final Project - Multimedia Center [Chicago, IL]

Upon observation of the site, one discomfort was clearly noted. Though the architecture surrounding the site was appealing in design, the environment was cluttered and congested. Due to the close proximity of buildings with each other, the area felt dense and uncomfortable. The program was to design a space for occupants to be productive; therefore, it was appropriate to design a building that would create convenience and accessibility to achieve this goal. The building was design to be a place of relief, both in relation to its environment and as a tone throughout the building. This is noted in its form and function.

The form itself contains three aspects of architecture, sunken architecture, stairs, and ramps. These aspects of form were documented as spatially relieving architecture, therefore incorporated into the design. In function, almost all of the roof is accessible to create great open space that could be used as circulation or destination. The enclosed courtyard also provides visual exits from almost anywhere in the building, providing a view of great relief while studying. This idea was to create peaceful presence and atmosphere for the occupants who are working within the building. The design is to positively influence the community as a space and persons by adding relief to a highly congested and busy space. This project can be concluded in question - “what could be more encouraging while being productive than to feel emotions of relief and peace when entering, occupying, and exiting the space in which productivity occurs?"

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Junior Studio Project 1 - Urban Cafe/Bookstore [N. Chestnut Street, Champaign, IL]

The site, prior to this design, contained an existing prairie garden. The garden was without many formal properties and was full of only trees, small plants, and short wire fences that would perimeter a path. This garden was full of air and negative space, creating a delightful visual link between N. Chestnut street and N. Market Street.

There were two aspects to the existing site and its surrounding environment that were to be maintained in the design of this cafe / bookstore hybrid. Rather than filling the alley that created a visual and spacial openness between a dense urban area with 4 opaque walls, this building was designed to capture those concepts. Vertical and horizontal beams that run over and along the building are supported with class and beams that conclude a clear open and breathable space through the entire space. Also, the ground floor and second floor are open to one another in multiple areas. The program minimizes opaque walls and enclosed spaces, especially in the longitudinal direction.

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Sophomore Studio Final Project - Seasonal Market [Downtown Champaign[

This Japanese design market is designed to be parallel to both weather and urban design. The market, located in downtown Champaign, maximizes the use of the site’s square footage. The “L”-shaped form also allows for a flexible gathering space. Fins that hang from the roof of the building are built on casters, allowing administration to move them back and forth. These moving building components create options for the space. The fins can be moved to prioritize open space, covered space, and even aesthetic. The building appropriately allows for different space types that can be appropriately selected for Illinois’ dramatic weather. Stalls may also be moved to the interior or exterior spaces of the building. Although the building is permanent, the function can be altered for any means. The building is divided into two core space: public and private. The administration resides in the front end of the building with translucent walls for moderate privacy, with access to both the storage and mechanical rooms. The offset of the two major spaces allows for loading and unloading in the back, with direct access to the storage foods for goods and miscellaneous resources. The bathroom is located opposite to the office space; however, the building’s wooden under-hang allows for a guided and aesthetic journey.

Project Award:

+ ARCH 272 Earl Prize Nominee (Spring 2017)

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Sophomore Studio Project - Construction Document Reiteration

[308 E. Green Street Champaign, IL 61820]